SUNDAY
March 24, 2019 | doors at 7:00pm
Sharing is Caring
Triple Ds presents:
SCOTT H. BIRAM
THE GODDAMN GALLOWS
Urban Pioneers
  • $17
  • $20
  • ADVANCE
  • DAY OF SHOW
Scott H. Biram
Rock ‘n’ Roll ain’t pretty and neither is Scott H. Biram. The self proclaimed ‘Dirty Old One Man Band’ successfully, and sometimes violently, lashes together blues, hillbilly and country precariously to raucous punk and godless metal.

Biram ain’t no candy-ass singer/songwriter either, sweetly strumming songs about girls with big eyes and dusty highways. His singing, yodeling, growling, leering and brash preachin’ and hollerin’ is accompanied by sloppy riffs and licks from his '59 Gibson guitar and pounding backbeat brought forth by his amplified left foot. The remainder of this one-man band consists of an unwieldy combination of beat-up amplifiers and old microphones strung together by a tangled mess of guitar cables.

Years of non-stop touring have honed his assault to a fine edge; his wide-eyed throw downs in the First Church of Ultimate Fanaticism routinely lead giddy followers to a fiery baptism.

Scott H. Biram won’t die. On May 11th, 2003, one month after being hit head-on by an 18-wheeler at 75 MPH, he took the stage at The Continental Club in Austin, TX in a wheel chair – I.V. still dangling from his arm. With 2 broken legs, a broken foot, a broken arm and 1 foot less of his lower intestine, Biram unleashed his trademark musical wrath.

When Scott H. Biram took the stage at his 2004 SXSW festival showcase right after Kris Kristofferson he was quoted as growling “They said that was a hard act to follow….I’m a hard act to follow motherfuckers!!” The stunned crowd looked on.

“Scott’s self described ‘dirty old one-man band’ had a captivating immediacy that big rock shows rarely reach. On stage Scott is a man possessed, spitting and snarling like a Mississippi juke-joint shouter on a moonshine bender.” – Eben Sterling, Thrasher

“He has a true stage presence that could be fairly compared to that of Clint Eastwood on film. The dude’s more dude than most other dudes you will ever meet.” – Austin Columnist

“An impassioned multi-instrumentalist unleashing a brutal cacophany with the fury of someone whose check from the Devil finally cleared. Half dirty blues, half underground punk, half honky-tonk, half revival meeting…oh shut up about the math. You’ll see the light.” – Dayna Papaleo, Rochester City News

“His barbarous exorcism of Depression-era blues—with a bedrock of frantic flatpicking, foot stomps into a floor mike, and gutteral growls through a distortion mike—has made Biram a rising star in Austin.” – Brian T. Atkinson, No Depression

“Biram is the kind of guy you don’t laugh at all the way just in case he really is crazy. We all wanna be entertained, but nobody wants to get stabbed in the head with a screwdriver.” – Frank de Blase, Rochester City News

“With a raw immediacy that recalls Hasil Adkins and Bob Log III, Biram specializes in a twisted hybrid of gutbucket, hillbilly and godless metal. He’ll praise the virtues of moonshine and titty bars one minute, then tongue-lash city slickers and hippies the next.” – John La Briola, Houston Press
The Goddamn Gallows
The Goddamn Gallows formed in 2004 by founding members and Lansing/Detroit natives Mikey Classic on guitar and vocals, Fishgutzzz on upright bass, and Amanda Kill on drums -replaced by current drummer Uriah Baker (aka; "Baby Genius") in 2006. The trio started out migrating around the West for a time, holing up in Hollywood squats and squalid apartments, before releasing several albums: The Gallows EP (2004), Life of Sin (2005), and Gutterbillyblues (2007), and finally hitting the road nearly full-time to establish their presence in the psychobilly-country scene while honing their self-described "twanged-out punk rock gutterbilly".
In 2009 the addition of Avery, a fire-breathing, accordion and washboard player, as well as Jayke Orvis (formerly of the .357 String Band) on mandolin and banjo, prompted The Goddamn Gallows to explore many new directions with their songwriting and in their live performances. As evidenced on their most recent 2009 album, Ghost of The Rails, and as witnessed by their spectacular and tireless live shows, The Goddamn Gallows began to forge a path founded on their very own brand of contagious primeval abandon: an unpretentious and from-the-gut carnivalesque smorgasbord of parts old time revival, circus sideshow, and good old-fashioned rock and roll. The result falls dead center into a head on collision between something like a Western honky-tonk impromptu parking lot rodeo, and Suburbia (the 1983 Penelope Spheeris cult classic film)


Though still officially Michigan-based, they have toured relentlessly since 2007, practically living out of their van and regularly performing as many as 200 dates a year. They continue to rapidly grow a devoted following built on their visceral and volatile blend of multiple American music styles, and frantic live energy -but still with just enough hardcore and punk influence to make your parents hate it.
Mix one part Texas fiddle and one part Tennessee banjo, add doghouse bass and a splash of guitar and you have a delicious cocktail for your ears known as the Urban Pioneers. This string band hammers out a variety of original songs that encompass old time hillbilly music, western swing, rockabilly, and even a few gypsy type songs for good measure. The talent in the band clearly lies with miss Liz Sloan. If there had ever been any ‘heck’ in her fiddle then it is all gone by now because she plays the heck out of it night after night. The whole reason Jared even writes or sings songs is so that miss Liz will have something to play along to. Jared is a self-proclaimed “horrible banjo player” so we won’t talk about him too much but he does write some silly songs. The duo is accompanied on the road by a doghouse bass player, a guitar player, and whoever else they can find that can play something and doesn’t snore. The band stays on the road all over the world for over 250 days a year. In 2014 they toured extensively in the US and Europe and in 2015 they will do it again and add South America to the list. The Urban Pioneers love to play music for people.
Until recently, Liz Sloan and Jared McGovern have been household names in the underground roots community because they were outstanding backing musicians, but it didn’t take long for the Urban Pioneers to prove themselves to music lovers of all kinds. Liz and Jared toured and recorded with countless bands in the past but when their last band broke up they decided to give it a go on their own. The Urban Pioneers started out as a means of transportation to pick up a bass that Jared had built from Knight String Bass. The bass was a thousand miles away and the only way the couple knew how to travel is by touring. Jared had recently been trying to learn clawhammer banjo so they wrote some silly songs, recorded them, and joined the Coney Island Road Show that was headed to Florida where the bass was. They needed to think of a name and a few weeks before a police officer called the urban pioneers because they were “white kids living in the roughest neighborhood in Pittsburgh”.
Since that day the Urban Pioneers have been moving forward and have never looked back. Their first release “Addicted to the Road” is comprised of eleven tracks about playing music, touring, and partying; the things they know best. It is available on Roots Union Records. The band is excited to go back into the studio in early 2015 and record their follow up album and tour around the world supporting it. The Urban Pioneers have big plans for the future and will always be in a town near you soon.
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