FRIDAY
October 26 -
SATURDAY
October 27, 2018
Sharing is Caring
Atlanta Mess-Around presents:
ATLANTA MESS-AROUND 2018 W/ ROKY ERICKSON & PROTEX!
Roky Erickson
Protex
Bush Tetras
Gentleman Jesse
Radioactivity
Death Valley Girls
Bad Sports
Dan Melchoir
Country Westerns
Static Static
Benni
Dinos Boys
GG King
Dunch w/ Greg Cartwright
few more tba!!
$65
ADVANCE

$65
DAY OF SHOW
FRIDAY October 26, 2018
doors open at
7:30pm
Dan Melchoir | Country Westerns
SATURDAY October 27, 2018
doors open at
2:00pm
Patois Counselors | Animal Show | Vincas
SATURDAY October 27, 2018
doors open at
8:00pm
Dinos Boys | Static Static | Bênní
BUSH TETRAS
Radioactivity
Radioactivity have announced their first of two albums on Dirtnap Records! Radioactivity is a continuation of The Novice, Jeff Burke's band while living in Japan. Jeff has since moved back to Texas, and out of respect to the Japanese lineup of the band, has changed the name to Radioactivity. Some of these songs are re-purposed Novice tracks, while others are brand new. Jeff is one of the most distinctive songwriters in the punk rock underground, and these songs will sound instantly familiar to any fans of The Marked Men or Potential Johns. Band members include Jeff Burke, Mark Ryan, and Gregory Rutherford, whose credits read like an all-star lineup of Texas punk and garage rock royalty, including members of The Marked Men, Mind Spiders, Bad Sports, Wax Museums, The Reds, VIDEO, and The Novice. Radioactivity's first, self-titled LP is due out on Dirtnap Records in October, and it will coincide with a Radioactivity 7" released on Germany's Alien Snatch! Records.The album will be promoted by an October/November European tour supported by Japan's Suspicious Beasts. Look for ANOTHER Radioactivity LP coming soon on Dirtnap!
Bad Sports
Hailing from Denton, Texas, Bad Sports are a band whose music is a powerful fusion of punk rock velocity and attitude, hard rock guitar raunch, and power pop hooks. Influenced by old-school punk bands like the Ramones and the Buzzcocks as well as the '70s hard rock that's an unavoidable presence in their home town, Bad Sports feature Orville Neeley (also a member of OBN IIIs) on guitar and vocals, TV's Daniel Fried (who also plays in Wax Museums) on bass and vocals, and Gregory Rutherford (also doing double duty in Wax Museums) on drums. In 2008, the band began spreading the word about their music with a handful of 7" vinyl releases on Big Action Records and Boom Chick Records, and in the fall of 2009. the Atlanta-based Douchemaster label issued the band's self-titled debut album on CD, LP, and MP3 (it was also released on cassette by Burger Records). Plenty of touring followed, including a handful of dates with '70s power pop hero Paul Collins. In August 2011, Bad Sports teamed with Portland, Oregon's Dirtnap Records to release their second full-length album, Kings of the Weekend. - Mark Deming, All Music
GG King
When the Carbonas died, Atlanta wept. Mothers and children, left orphaned by the deceased, wandered the streets with tears streaming mottled faces. Strong and silent men struggled to maintain composure, and they retreated to basement workbenches, biting lips, cracking knuckles, running hands through thinning hair, sullenly wondering: "Why?" Skies darkened. A palpable feeling of devastating loss plagued the city. Nay, the world.

Thankfully, ex-frontman Greg "GG" King wasted little time in yanking up his knickers and pursuing new noise. He wrote a series of tunes not unlike those he contributed to the Carbonas – that winning mix of hyperstrummed '70s Europunk and brawny stateside r'n'r pummel intact – and amassed a crew of friends and former bandmates to help him flesh out the din. He released a handful of solid teaser singles, played a number of good shows. He reasserted himself as one of Atlanta's greatest exports.

And now, with the release of Esoteric Lore, his first full-length longplayer, the venerable GG King moves beyond his old guard, skindiving in new sinkholes.

Yes, herein we find some highly Carbonic moments – traces of Hubble Bubble, The Kids, Zero Boys, et. al. – but we also hear the King & Co. vamp on vibes harnessed only previously by goth-punk forebears: early Christian Death, 45 Grave. We sense smudged traces of minimal mania a la 100 Flowers. We catch whiffs of the emblematic hardcore of the Germs & T.S.O.L., feel the plod 'n' thud of Negative Trend. We're treated to bits of hijacked shortwave, aural static clinging 'tween songs proper, bleeding into the tunes themselves. And we hear a walloping wayward punk rec that nods knowingly toward L.A.-circa-'82, but in melding its influences, somehow sounds distinctly Atlanta, and right now.

Protex
Protex formed in 1978 as a direct result of band members witnessing firsthand The Clash’s now infamous visit to Belfast the previous year when their gig was pulled at the eleventh hour due to insurance wrangles. The Clash’s trip to Belfast in 1977 is viewed by many as the catalyst for the Punk movement in N. Ireland. The band was greatly influenced by The Clash and even took their initial name (Protex Blue) from an album track on Strummer and Co’s self titled debut album. The band at the time had absolutely no idea that the Clash song was in fact about condoms.

Their debut live performance came a few months later in 1978 at Knock Methodist Church Hall in Belfast. Shortly after this show the band shortened their name to Protex and continued gigging around Belfast eventually securing a radio session with local station Downtown Radio. Through regular gigging around the city the band soon came to the attention of Terri Hooley and a three track debut 45 was subsequently released on his Good Vibrations record label. The Belfast label having previously released singles by Rudi, Victim, The Outcasts and The Undertones. The single would go on to receive two different sleeve pressings on the Good Vibrations label before later being released on the London based Rough Trade Records (the only edition of the single not to feature a foldout sleeve).

On the back of good reviews including one from influential NME scribe Tony Parsons and lots of air play the band then secured a prestigious BBC Radio 1 session for the Kid Jenson show. The exposure gained from this in turn resulted in major record company interest in the form of Polydor Records. The band were all still in sixth form at school studying for their A levels when A&R men came over from London to see them play live together with the Xdreamysts at Chester’s in Portrush. Both bands were subsequently signed to the label and during the Easter holidays 1979 the band went to London to record their debut single for their new record company. I Can’t Cope was released to a flurry of radio airplay and music press interest and with their new record company backing they secured a UK support slot on an up and coming Adam and the Ants UK tour. This tour only lasted for one show before Protex pulled out of the tour, the general consensus being that they weren’t best suited to the audiences that the Ants were attracting at that time. They did however permanently move to London after this and now under the management of Mary – Carol Canon set up base at the Chessington house once the residence of Genesis .

I Can Only Dream was the next single to be released by Polydor. It was produced by Chas Chandler, ex bass player with The Animals and Slade producer. There were also sessions recorded at Mickey Most’s The Rak studios around this time too which the band liked but Polydor rejected as being “too produced”. These recordings remain unreleased. Another UK support tour soon got under way in Liverpool, this time opening for the Boomtown Rats. These dates were followed by a Scottish tour and further tours in America and Canada in 1980. Three tracks from the bands New York City concert at the Hurrah Club were filmed by John T Davis and subsequently made into a short movie interspersed with footage of the band at the St Patrick’s day parades in the city. This short film was entitled Sham Rock and has never officially been released but you can view a clip below. The bands final release for Polydor was the A Place In Your Heart single after which they were disappointingly dropped by the label. The band did however return to the Pound Club in Belfast for several farewell shows before they eventually folded.

In 210 New York label Sing Sing Records located the long lost Protex Polydor album recordings and released them on a limited run vinyl pressing entitled Strange Obsessions, igniting renewed interest in the band. This coupled with youtube hits in excess of 30,000 for just one of their tracks along and a forthcoming Japanese release of the John T Davis movie Shellshock Rock prompted original members Aidan Murtagh (guitar/vocals) and David McMaster (guitar/vocals) to reform the band. They are ably assisted by new members Norman Boyd on bass (ex Preacher John, Stonefish, Dead FM and Shake. ) and Gordie Walker on drums (ex Crash Into June, Glam Slam, Henry Cluney (SLF) and Stardust to name just a few). The band have several gigs planned for the summer of 2012.
GENTLEMAN JESSE
Gentleman Jesse
Death Valley Girls
It’s easy to mistake Death Valley Girls for a biker gang. First of all, the members of this snarling garage-rock quartet all look like they jumped out from the pages of Karlheinz Weinberger’s Rebel Youth (an amazing book documenting ’50s and ’60s juvenile gangs). And at any one of their shows, a row of ratty, raked-out choppers can be seen lined up in classic motorcycle-club formation.

Even their names are reminiscent of vintage biker B-movies: Bonnie Bloomgarden is the leader of the pack. Peering out from a straight line of jet-black bangs is a bass player who just goes by “Rocky”. Laura Kelsey (formerly of surf/garage girls The Flytraps) plays Mo Tucker meets Nick Knox style drums and Larry Schemel who played in the last incarnation of legendary L.A. punk pagans The Flesh Eaters plays fuzz-heavy guitar like he just might be the bastard son of Davie Allan.

Speaking of guitar, you’d be hard-pressed to find a meaner one than the opening riff for “No Reason,” the most menacing song from DVG’s debut album Street Venom. It basically sounds like Larry plugged his guitar straight into a hornet hive and then kicked it. When the rhythm section kicks in it gives the song a sinister kind of rumble that would make Link Wray proud. Bloomgarden’s snotty, bratty vocal sneer cements their sound with old-school girl-gang attitude.

- Eric Shea